All senior secondary students are expected to undertake their studies in a way that is honest and fair.

This means that:

  • all work you submit for marking must be your own work
  • you must acknowledge where you have borrowed or used someone else’s work
  • you must not help other people to be dishonest, for example, by giving them your answers or your essay for them to copy.

Whenever you use someone else ideas, images, information, words, data or music in your work, you must acknowledge where you got that idea (or image, information, etc.) from. This is done by including accurate references throughout your work.

Referencing allows makers to clearly see what parts of your work are your own, what parts you have borrowed from other people’s work, and where you found it.

If you do not reference appropriately

If you hand something in to be marked and have not referenced where you have used other people’s work, you are being untruthful. In fact, this is a form of cheating.

TASC takes the issue of academic integrity very seriously. Penalties for any form of cheating or dishonesty in your externally assessed folios or project work may include having your results for that particular assessment cancelled or, in extreme cases, having all of your results for the entire year cancelled.

Further information

For information about referencing styles, frequently asked questions, and tips and hints for correct referencing, see TASC’s Academic Integrity Guide.


Examples

An extract of an original source is provided below, with examples and explanations showing plagiarism as well as where the source has been appropriately acknowledged.

Note: The footnote referencing style has been used for these examples. Speak with your teachers about which referencing style to use in each course.

Source (extract)

The journey from St Helens to Maria Island takes in two of Tasmania’s most stirring natural attractions – perfectly formed Wineglass Bay (arguably Tasmania’s most famous image) and wildlife‑rich Maria Island1.

1 Ham, A., Australia’s Best Trips: 38 Amazing Road Trips (Footscray, Vic.: Lonely Planet, 2015), 376.

Travelling from St Helens to Maria Island you will see two of Tasmania’s most stirring natural attractions.  These are: Wineglass Bay, which arguably Tasmania’s most famous image, and Maria Island, which is rich with wildlife.


In example 1 the writer has pieced together sections of the source word-for-word using only a few words of their own.  The source text has not been acknowledged and there is no way for a person reading this piece to know which words have been borrowed from the source.  Example 1 is plagiarism.

The scenery between St Helens and Maria Island is beautiful. Some consider the perfectly formed Wineglass Bay and wild-life rich Maria Island to be Tasmania’s most stirring natural attractions.


In example 2, the writer has included some paraphrasing which is appropriate, although it is necessary to acknowledge the information that has been paraphrased.  They have also borrowed some of the source word-for-word without including a proper acknowledgement. Saying ‘some consider’ does not make it clear enough where you borrowed the information from. Where the writer has borrowed words verbatim, quotation marks with an appropriate citation should be used.    Example 2 is plagiarism.

When you travel from St Helens to Maria Island, you will see two of Tasmania best natural attractions – the ‘perfectly formed Wineglass Bay (arguably Tasmania’s most famous image) and wildlife‑rich Maria Island’1.

1 Ham, A., Australia’s Best Trips: 38 Amazing Road Trips (Footscray, Vic.: Lonely Planet, 2015), 376


In example 3 the writer has used quotation marks to acknowledge some but not all of the words that have been borrowed from the source.  This makes it look like most of the piece is the writers own words, which this is not the case. You must be very careful to acknowledge everything you have borrowed from other people’s work. Every time you include a quote, it must be in quotation marks.  Example 3 is plagiarism.

Some of ‘Tasmania’s best natural attractions’1 can be seen when you drive along the east coast of Tasmania. Anthony Ham notes, in particular, that Wineglass Bay is arguably Tasmania’s most famous image.

1 Ham, A., Australia’s Best Trips: 38 Amazing Road Trips (Footscray, Vic.: Lonely Planet, 2015), 376


In example 4, the writer has used quotation marks and included an appropriate acknowledgement of the source.  In the second sentence, the writer acknowledges that the information comes from author Anthony Ham, however has failed to use quotation marks or include a citation for the words in that sentence that have been borrowed.  You must acknowledge a source every time you use it in your work.  In example 4, the writer should have paraphrased Anthony Ham’s words or used quotation marks with another citation.  Example 4 is plagiarism.

Anthony Ham highlights how beautiful the east coast of Tasmania is.  In particular, he suggests that the road between St Helens and Maria Island allows travellers to enjoy ‘two of Tasmania’s most stirring natural attractions’, including the iconic and picturesque Wineglass Bay1.

1 Ham, A., Australia’s Best Trips: 38 Amazing Road Trips (Footscray, Vic.: Lonely Planet, 2015), 376


In example 5, the writer has included an acceptable paraphrase of the source.  They have acknowledged the author of the source, including the use of quotation marks and correct citation where an exact phrase has been borrowed.  Example 5 is not plagiarism.

There are wonderful views available on the road between St Helens and Maria Island including Wineglass Bay, which has become an iconic landmark for Tasmania1.

1 Ham, A., Australia’s Best Trips: 38 Amazing Road Trips (Footscray, Vic.: Lonely Planet, 2015), 376


In example 6 the writer has paraphrased the source in an acceptable way and included an appropriate citation to acknowledge the source of the information.  Example 6 is not plagiarism.