Tasmanian Certificate of Education: Standards

To achieve the Tasmanian Certificate of Education (TCE) you must meet the five standards of the TCE which are outlined below.

 

To meet the participation and achievement standard for the TCE you need to have 120 credit points in senior secondary education and training, with at least 80 credit points in studies at Level 2 or higher.

Each TASC accredited course and other learning recognised by TASC (including vocational education and training studies) is given a credit point value. This value shows the amount of learning at a set standard that can count towards the TCE.

You can meet this standard with a reasonably challenging two-year program of study at senior secondary level with at least 1200 hours of study in senior secondary subjects. You can also meet this standard with a full program of VET units of competency.

Check the course planner for more information about courses.

To meet the everyday adult reading and writing in English standard for the TCE you need to show that you can:

  • read and understand instructions
  • interpret information from diagrams, graphs and charts
  • write a brief formal letter
  • use questions to gather information and provide a verbal report.

You can meet this standard if you successfully complete a TASC accredited course that includes the standard or an identified VET course or other TASC recognised formal learning qualifications to show that you meet this standard.

Check the course planner for more information about your selected courses.

To meet the everyday adult mathematics standard for the TCE you need to show that you can use common maths knowledge and skills to:

  • measure
  • solve basic problems
  • develop budgets
  • collect survey information and interpret it
  • carry out calculations involving fractions and metric quantities.

You can meet this standard if you successfully complete a TASC accredited course that includes the standard or an identified VET course or other TASC recognised formal learning qualifications to show that you meet this standard.

Check the course planner for more information about your selected courses.

If you have not successfully completed a course indicating that you have met the standard you can take an everyday adult standard skills test.

To meet the everyday adult use of computers and the internet standard for the TCE you need to show that you can:

  • use a computer
  • use common applications such as a word processor or spreadsheet
  • send and receive information by email
  • search the internet
  • safe and ethical use of computers.

You can meet this standard if you successfully complete a TASC accredited course that includes the standard or an identified VET course or other TASC recognised formal learning qualifications to show that you meet this standard.

Check the course planner for more information about your selected courses.

If you have not successfully completed a course indicating that you have met the standard you can take an everyday adult standard skills test.

The TCE requires you to develop a pathway plan during Year 10 and review your progress before you finish your senior secondary education and training.

We can make special arrangements so that students completing their senior secondary education and training outside the school system can demonstrate that they meet this standard.

Contact us for more information or chat with teachers at your school or college.

Tasmanian Certificate of Education: Details

This course describes the qualification called the Tasmanian Certificate of Education (TCE). This qualification is available to all Tasmanians who reach the prescribed standards. The TCE is a qualification for those completing the senior secondary phase of education and training – the first phase of life-long learning after school. To gain this qualification a person must meet or do better than requirements for standards in: everyday adult reading, writing and communication, mathematics, and use of computers and the internet; requirements for amount and level of participation and achievement in education and training; and requirements for pathway planning. People can meet these requirements in different ways, in different settings and over different periods of time.

The qualification has been developed in consultation with a wide range of stakeholders including employers, industry bodies, education and training providers, parent and community bodies, schools and colleges.

In introducing this qualification the Office of Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification recognises that:

  • too many young Tasmanians are participating and achieving much less than they potentially can in senior secondary education and training,
  • much higher levels of development of skills and knowledge at the senior secondary level (and beyond) are important for the social and economic future of Tasmania and these young Tasmanians,
  • approaches and practices within senior secondary education and training will be a significant factor in achieving major improvements in rates of participation and achievement.

The importance of the Tasmanian Certificate of Education lies in its potential to contribute to these improvements. With community backing, especially from business and industry, it can send powerful signals to young persons and to education and training providers that more and better achievement is important for the social and economic future of these young people and of Tasmania.

Aims And Objectives

The aims/purposes of this qualification are to:

recognise that a person has achieved or exceeded a set of requirements marking the end of the first phase of postcompulsory education and training
recognise that these requirements can be achieved or exceeded in different ways, in different settings and over different periods of time whether in full- or part-time programs at school/college or via registered training organisations or through combining work and training
recognise achievement and participation in both formal and informal learning.
The objectives of introducing and maintaining the qualification are:

to set and maintain a worthwhile and achievable set of standards for learners to achieve or exceed when completing the initial phase of their post-compulsory education and training
to build and maintain widespread community confidence in, and understanding of, the credibility and integrity of the formal certification that learners have achieved or exceeded these standards
to reflect and support increases in the participation and achievement of Tasmanians in this phase of their learning.

Pathways

Pathways to the qualification include:

  • learners completing senior secondary education in Tasmania
  • individuals seeking the qualification based on other education and training
  • individuals seeking the qualification based on non-formal and informal learning.

Relationship With Other Certificates

The former certificate of listed qualifications known until 1 January 2009 as the TCE is now known as ‘the Qualifications Certificate (QC)’. Tasmanian Assessment, Standards and Certification (TASC) issues this certificate. It shows all the qualifications (TASC accredited courses, VET competencies and qualifications, and TASC recognised courses) a person has achieved up to the date of issue.

As from 1 January 2009, learners requesting formal certification of all their achievements are issued with the Qualifications Certificate.

The Tasmanian Certificate of Educational Achievement (TCEA) is a quality assured, centrally issued certificate that describes achievement through narrative. Designed for the small number of learners whose learning and achievement is often not adequately recognised by standardised forms of certification, it will provide a fairer and more just account of their senior secondary learning success.

The TCEA is complementary to the Tasmanian Certificate of Education (TCE) and is issued at the same time as the TCE and the Qualifications Certificate (QC) are usually issued.

Course Content

TASC has identified, subject to verification, existing TASC accredited courses, recognised formal learning qualifications and national Training Package qualifications and units of competency that will contribute to demonstrating achievement of the requirements of the qualification.

Assessment

1. Senior secondary processes
The assessment of enrolled senior secondary learners will be based on data collected by TASC in the course of its normal senior secondary assessment processes. TASC will usually complete the assessment and issue the qualification to learners meeting the requirements in December of each year as part of its standard certification procedures at no cost to the person completing the course.

2. Individual assessment
Individual persons (including senior secondary learners) may apply to TASC for recognition that they have met or done better than the requirements. TASC will carry out an assessment using a combination of recognition processes and standardised assessment tools as follows:

  • VET qualifications recognition based on TASC evaluation of qualifications
  • assessment of the applicant’s non-formal and informal learning.

Charges on a partial cost-recovery basis may apply.

Quality Assurance Process

Quality assurance arrangements exist for all the achievement results that can be used to demonstrate meeting the requirement of the TCE:

  • TASC accredited courses
  • VET nationally recognised qualifications issued by Registered Training Organisations
  • TASC recognised formal learning qualifications issued by other institutions/organisations
  • TASC issued qualifications such as the Individual Learning Qualification
  • Safety-net testing of ‘everyday adult’ skill sets.

TASC’s verification processes will include:

  • going to destinations (employment, further education, training, higher education) for feedback about the demonstrated skills of holders of the TCE
  • gathering evidence of learner achievement.

Standards

Everyday Adult Reading and Writing in English

The standard is ‘everyday adult reading and writing in English’ – for example, reading procedures and instructions, interpreting information from diagrams, graphs and charts, writing a brief formal letter, using questions to gather information and provide a verbal report. ‘English’ means Standard Australian English (SAE). SAE is the variety of spoken and written English language in Australia used in more formal settings such as for official or public purposes, and recorded in dictionaries, style guides and grammars. While it is always dynamic and evolving, it is recognised as the ‘common language’ of Australians.

Many people will show that they meet or do better than this standard by gaining a ‘Satisfactory Achievement/Pass’ award (or better) in a number of identified TASC accredited senior secondary courses.

Other learners will gain identified Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualifications or TASC recognised formal learning qualifications to show that they meet or do better than this standard.

A small minority of learners may not have a course pathway or successfully completed a course indicating that they have met the standard. In such cases ‘safety-net’ testing of the skill set is available. A ‘pass’ in the relevant TASC ‘safety-net’ test will show that such a learner has met the standard.

See Appendix 1.

Everyday Adult Mathematics

The standard is ‘everyday adult mathematics’ – for example, using common maths knowledge and skills to measure, solve basic problems, develop budgets, collect survey information and interpret it, and carry out calculations involving fractions and metric quantities.

Many people will show that they meet or do better than this standard by gaining a ‘Satisfactory Achievement/Pass’ award (or better) in a number of identified TASC accredited senior secondary courses.

Other learners will gain identified Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualifications or TASC recognised formal learning qualifications to show that they meet or do better than this standard.

A small minority of learners may not have a course pathway or successfully completed a course indicating that they have met the standard. In such cases ‘safety-net’ testing of the skill set is available. A ‘pass’ in the relevant TASC ‘safety-net’ test will show that such a learner has met the standard.

See Appendix 2.

Everyday Adult Use of Computers and the Internet

The standard is ‘everyday adult use of computers and the internet’ – for example, using a computer, using common applications such as a word processor or spreadsheet, sending and receiving information by e-mail, and searching the internet.

Many people will show that they meet or do better than this standard by gaining a ‘Satisfactory Achievement/Pass’ award (or better) in a number of identified TASC accredited senior secondary courses.

Other learners will gain identified Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualifications or TASC recognised formal learning qualifications to show that they meet or do better than this standard.

A small minority of learners may not have a course pathway or successfully completed a course indicating that they have met the standard. In such cases ‘safety-net’ testing of the skill set is available. A ‘pass’ in the relevant ‘safety-net’ test will show that such a learner has met the standard.

See Appendix 3.

Participation and Achievement Standard

The standard is ‘a significant amount of learning at a set standard’. It recognises a very broad range of learning, and is flexible about where, when and how that learning happens.

To do this, each type of learning at TASC complexity level 1 or higher is given a size value. If a learner gains a qualification/is issued with a unit of competency the learning’s size value counts as credit points, at the specified complexity level, towards meeting the TCE’s participation and achievement standard. To meet the participation and achievement standard a person needs to have 120 credit points, with at least 80 credit points in studies rated at TASC complexity Level 2 or higher.

Many learners will show that they meet or do better than this standard with a reasonably challenging two-year program of post-Year 10 learning of at least 1,200 hours of study in senior secondary courses. Others will show that they meet or do better than this standard with a full program of VET. Some will use combinations of senior secondary studies, VET and other qualifications recognised by TASC. Some people will complete an apprenticeship to show that they meet or do better than this standard.

Detailed information is provided by TASC on credit points for various TASC accredited and TASC recognised qualifications, and VET qualifications and units of competency.

At least 80 of the credit points must come from learning that have a complexity rating of Level 2 or above. A TASC complexity rating of 2 means that typically knowledge and skills are concrete and factual with some theoretical and/or technical elements, applied in familiar and predictable contexts, involve routine issues, in conditions where there is substantial support and supervision and limited judgement and discretion is needed. See Appendix 4.

The 120 credit points must come from courses/qualifications/units of competency (or their equivalent) that have been assigned at least a level 2 robustness rating. Level 2 robustness means that the evidence on which assessment judgements are made, though it may be largely inferential and only indirectly related to the achievement, is available and sufficient for making the assessment decision. See Appendix 5.

Pathway Planning Standard

The standard is ‘to have developed and reviewed plans for education and training’. Most learners will meet this standard by developing a plan during Year 10 and reviewing their progress at some time before they finish their senior secondary education and training. From 2007, all Tasmanian schools have to make sure that Year 10 learners develop a pathway plan and register it with us by the end of the year. A learner’s plan will include their career goals and the education and training they need to reach these goals.

TASC will make special arrangements so that people completing their senior secondary education and training outside the school system can meet this standard. Special provisions will be made for adults applying for the TCE.

See Appendix 6.

Qualification To Be Awarded on Successful Completion Of This Course

A person will be awarded the Tasmanian Certificate of Education by TASC on successful completion of this course.

Requirements To Receive The Qualification

A person will be awarded the Tasmanian Certificate of Education by TASC if they are assessed by TASC as meeting or doing better than the following requirements:

  • everyday adult reading and writing in English
  • everyday adult mathematics
  • everyday adult use of computers and the internet
  • completion of a full program of senior secondary education and training
  • development and review of plans for the future.

Course Evaluation

Courses are accredited for a specific period of time (up to five years) and they are evaluated in the year prior to the expiry of accreditation.

As well, anyone may request a review of a particular aspect of an accredited course throughout the period of accreditation. Such requests for amendment will be considered in terms of the likely improvements to the outcomes for learners and the possible consequences for delivery of the course.

TASC can evaluate the need and appropriateness of an accredited course at any point throughout the period of accreditation.

Accreditation

Courses are accredited for a specific period of time (up to five years) and they are evaluated in the year prior to the expiry of accreditation.

Version History

Version 1 – accredited on 10 December 2013 by the Tasmanian Qualifications Authority.

Course accreditation renewed for the period 1 January 2017 until 31 December 2018.

Course accreditation renewed for the period 1 January 2019 until 31 December 2019 (renewed on 25 June 2018).

 

Example TCE certificate

Everyday Adult Reading and Writing in English

Examples of tasks at this standard include:

  • writes short formal letters outlining instructions for a particular purpose (e.g. closure of bank account)
  • reads procedural texts, where the information is supported by diagrams, to remedy a known problem (e.g. locates problem with a machine and carries out repairs using a repair manual for guidance)
  • interprets information gained from tables, charts and other graphic information (e.g. plans travel arrangements for a meeting using a flight schedule)
  • follows existing guidelines for the collection, analysis and organisation of information, e.g. takes detailed notes of an enquiry requesting information about services
  • completes a range of formatted texts (e.g. selects and integrates information relevant to completed job on job report form, records information on an automobile maintenance record form)
  • writes simple instructions for a particular routine task.

The standard is illustrated and exemplified by the Australian Core Skills Framework (ACSF) performance Level 3 (reading, writing and oral communications) descriptors available at: https://www.education.gov.au/australian-core-skills-framework.

Everyday Adult Mathematics

Examples of tasks at this standard include:

  • uses a distance scale to find the shortest route between two locations on a map and considers road and terrain conditions in deciding preferred route
  • selects totals and orders items in bulk from a catalogue within budgetary constraints (e.g. stationery catalogue)
  • collects information by survey and represents information in appropriate tabular and graphic form (e.g. surveys fellow learner on travel to college, and comments on adequacy of public transport available)
  • expresses and calculates with metric quantities (e.g. interprets and costs quantities of cheese given in different forms such as 350g, 0.35kg)
  • measures common three dimensional shapes (e.g. a room, and represents the information on an appropriate diagram drawn to scale)
  • calculates with common fractions and metric measurements (e.g. adjusts the quantities in a recipe by halving or doubling to obtain the required amount)
  • uses a variety of methods to analyse sales advertising by comparing savings on a number of different items (e.g. at 12% off, 15% off, 1/3 off, price reduced by $10)
  • compares casual and permanent rates of pay over a given time span for work of the same nature
  • compares and contrasts costs of alternative types of travel, e.g. travel options for three people using plane, bus, train, taxi and hire car for a journey between two large cities. Presents options in an oral report which supports choice of most economical mode of transport.

The standard is illustrated and exemplified by the Australian Core Skills Framework (ACSF) performance level 3 (numeracy) descriptors available at: https://www.education.gov.au/australian-core-skills-framework.

Everyday Adult Use of Computers and the Internet

The core components of the standard requires appropriate for marking the end of a person’s first stage of life-long learning after school:

  • using a computer and common software (e.g. word processing, spreadsheet) effectively, safely and productively
  • using the internet and email effectively, safely and productively.

A more detailed and technical account illustrating the meaning of the standard follows. This has been organised around the six components of the MCEETYA PMRT Taskforce definition of ‘ICT literacy’. The details that follow are there to illuminate the standard, to flesh out the understanding of ‘everyday adult use of computers and the internet in today’s world’, not to provide a checklist of features that must be individually assessed.

1. ACCESSING INFORMATION
Identifying the information needed and knowing how to find and retrieve information

Operate computer equipment, for example:

  • seek the necessary information to log on.

Open files, for example:

  • select software appropriate to the task
  • find a file when pointed to its location
  • carry out basic file search functions
  • identify and open file.

Close file, for example:

  • save and close file
  • store data in accordance with designated procedures
  • exit program in accordance with designated procedures.

Use common software (such as office applications), for example:

  • retrieve the required data from the file<
  • edit the file
  • save, name/rename and close the file.

2. MANAGING INFORMATION
Organising and storing information for retrieval and reuse

Retrieve data, for example:

  • locate data to be retrieved.

Carry out file maintenance, for example:

  • copy, delete and rename files as required
  • create folders and directories as needed.

Demonstrate understanding of storage and backup requirements in the particular place in which a computer is being used, for example:

  • adapt to the storage and backup protocols of the particular place (e.g. workplace, library, college) in which the person is using a computer.

Comply with virus protection practices as required, for example:

  • show care in opening email attachments, paying attention to warnings provided by virus software.

3. EVALUATING
Reflecting on the processes used to design and construct ICT solutions and about making judgements regarding the integrity, relevance and usefulness of information.

Use manuals and online help to solve problems, for example:

  • use help options within programs
  • use online help for software programs to solve problems
  • use manuals and training notes to solve problems
  • access user documentation where provided.

Use internet to source information, for example:

  • demonstrate internet search engine skills
  • confidently navigate and use web-based applications.

4. DEVELOPING NEW UNDERSTANDINGS
Creating information and knowledge by synthesising, adapting, applying, designing, inventing or authoring

Demonstrate flexibility needed to work efficiently in an ICT environment, for example:

  • show ability to use a range of software to complete tasks
  • demonstrate adaptability to new ICT developments.

5. COMMUNICATING WITH OTHERS
Exchanging information by sharing knowledge and creating information products to suit the audience, the context and the medium

Produce simple documents on computer, for example Using common software (such as office applications) and:

  • produce document with the required information
  • produce document in the required style and format
  • save document regularly to avoid loss of data.

Use email software, for example
Using common software (such as office applications) and:

  • create emails
  • send emails
  • open emails
  • delete or move emails from the inbox as needed to maintain efficient and effective usage.

Print document, for example:

  • select appropriate printer from software’s print menu
  • use print preview to check format and layout
  • make adjustments as necessary
  • ensure that correct stationery is loaded into the printer
  • print document.

6. USING ICT APPROPRIATELY
Making critical, reflective and strategic ICT decisions and using ICT responsibly by considering social, legal and ethical issues

Awareness of health/safety guidelines, for example:

  • observe guidelines relating to healthy and safe use of screen-based equipment and ergonomic workstations.

Apply ethical standards, for example:

  • demonstrate in practice an understanding of the difference between personal and business/organisational use of technology and software.

Email and internet etiquette:

  • comply with business/organisational principles and practices regarding internet and email usage.

Appropriate use of equipment provided in the workplace or public place, for example:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the protocols of using equipment provided in a particular environment
  • be aware of personal use policies.

Additional indicators of the standard are contained with the ‘Technical’ aspects of the Australian Core Skills Framework (ACSF) performance Level 3 (reading, writing, oral communications and numeracy) descriptors available at: https://www.education.gov.au/australian-core-skills-framework.

 Broad DescriptionIllustrative ApplicationVET competencies at this level are often those characteristic of those found in AQF:
LEVEL 3Successful completion of a qualification at this level would mean that the learner would be able to carry out tasks and activities that involve a combination of theoretical and/or technical and factual knowledge and skills. Judgement is required in varying guidelines or procedures to deal effectively with any unusual or unexpected aspects that may arise. Some skills in organising self and/or others are also needed.This level is comparable with that considered suitable for courses contributing to the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR).III
LEVEL 2Successful completion of a qualification at this level would mean that a learner would be able to carry out tasks and activities that involve a range of knowledge and skills. These will include some basic theoretical and/or technical knowledge and skills. Limited judgement is required, such as making an appropriate selection from a range of given rules, guidelines or procedures.The TCE requires learners to have at least 80 credit points at this level of complexity or higher.II
LEVEL 1Successful completion of a qualification at this level would mean that a learner would be able to carry out tasks and activities that draw on a limited range of basic knowledge and skills. They generally have a substantial repetitive aspect to them. Minimum judgement is needed as there are usually very clear rules, guidelines or procedures to be followed.Courses at this level meet the minimum complexity set by TASC for a senior secondary course.I

ROBUSTNESS

Criteria for robustness ratings

Robustness Level Nature of Evidence of AchievementReliability/Precision of the EvidenceValidity/Truth of the Evidence
5The evidence is plentiful and varied, tangible, directly related to the achievement, readily open to scrutiny.It can be shown that the result would not change much with a different assessor or with assessment on another occasion or context and there are monitored procedures/processes that ensure the comparability of results from different providers.The match of the evidence and the level of performance implied by the result is clear and evident to all reasonable inquirers.
4The evidence is ample and directly related to the achievement and much of it is open to scrutiny
3The evidence is ample and mostly directly related to the achievement but although tangible evidence is not available for scrutiny there are clear reasons to trust the sources from which it came.It is not likely that the result would change significantly with a different assessor or with assessment on another occasion or context and there are processes for comparability of results from different providers.There is a relationship between the evidence and some aspects of the level of performance implied by the result.
2The evidence is sufficient and available, but at best mostly indirectly related to the achievement and largely inferential.
1The evidence is slight, indirectly related to the achievement, tenuously inferential, not open to view.It is likely that the result could change significantly with a different assessor or with the assessment on another occasion and there is no process for comparability of results from different providers.The evidence is at best tenuously related to the level of performance implied by the result.

Pathway Planning Standard

Definition – Can demonstrate skills in personal planning that show the person:

  • has developed a personal pathway plan
  • has lodged a personal pathway plan with TASC
  • has reviewed personal pathway plan against progress to date.

Examples of ways in which people show that they meet or exceed this requirement:

  1. A person who has:
    a. developed a Personal Pathway Plan following appropriate guidelines and specifications
    b. maintained a diary of ways in which elements of the “participation record” are achieved
    c. recorded negotiations with a Pathway Planning Officer, group adviser or adult mentor.
  2. An adult seeking recognition of prior learning identifying their education/training plans using a standardised template provided by TASC.